Wednesday, November 25, 2009

Women On Wednesday Wednesday November 25, 2009



Women on Wednesday~ Thank you Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell!

Susan at Rocks n' Reads West of Mars hosts Women on Wednesday.

WOW — Women on Wednesday.

Every Wednesday, write about a book you loved that’s written by a woman. Celebrate a woman author whose books you love. Talk about a book you’re dying to read.

This is a new meme to spotlight favorite FEMALE authors, as Publisher's Weekly has recently published their Best Reads of 2009, without a single female writer on their list.

So now we get to give the Women a Weekly Meme!

Susan says:

"WOW — Women on Wednesday.
Every Wednesday, write about a book you loved that’s written by a woman. Celebrate a woman author whose books you love. Talk about a book you’re dying to read.
"

This week I want to focus on a newly discovered female writer for me, Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell. I was introduced to Cranford this past September and absolutely fell in love with her writing. This book is filled with humor, close examinations of relationships, unrequited love, and classisms. I can hardly wait to read more of her novels.

Cranford is the best-known novel of the 19th century English writer Elizabeth Gaskell. It was first published in 1851 as a serial in the magazine Household Words, which was edited by Charles Dickens. After being overshadowed for a little, it has taken its place finally among the masterpieces of English fiction, along with Jane Austen and the Vicar of Wakefield. There has never been a more delightful and tender study of English village life, or one in which insight is so joined with kindliness.

This is a witty and poignant look at the market town of Cranford where women are the majority of the population. The railway is pushing its way relentlessly towards the village from Manchester, bringing fears of migrant workers and the breakdown of law and order. The arrival of handsome young Doctor Harrison causes yet further agitation, not just because of his revolutionary methods, but also because of his effect on the hearts of the village’s ladies. Meanwhile Miss Matty Jenkyns nurses her own heart following her forced abandonment of the man she loved since she was a young girl.

Some of her other novels include




I look forward to reading these other books and enjoying Elizabeth's humor and observations of 19th century England. Also Cranford is going to be on PBS soon as a rebroadcast for Masterpiece Theater. I can hardly wait for this to happen.
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2 comments:

  1. I read Wives and Daughters a couple of years ago and really enjoyed it. I just downloaded Cranford on to my Ipod, and looking forward to "hearing" it. Great author!

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  2. I want to say this is a new-to-me author, but... something here is going deja vu on me.

    Thanks for playing WOW with me this week! I appreciate it and hope you'll play again.

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